Month: October 2016

What are the consequences to my pilot’s license if I am convicted of OUI in Maine?

If you are the holder of a Pilot’s License, the consequences of an OUITitle 29-A §2411 conviction in Maine are serious, if not severe. The FAA imposes rigid reporting requirements, as one might imagine, due to the real threat to public safety involved in operating an aircraft in any impaired state. It should go without saying that one must never act as a pilot or crew member while under the influence of alcohol, within 8 hours of consuming alcohol, while using any drugs that affect one in any way contrary to safety, and so on,14 CFR 91.17(a) but even outside the operation of an aircraft, the FAA has an interest in any violation of the law that involves alcohol. . . .

Advance Health Care Directives: Making Your Own Health Care Decisions, Even When You Can’t

When planning for the future, many individuals are so focused on how their assets will be used or eventually distributed, that they often overlook planning for their own health care in the event of their incapacity. Individuals can create a power of attorney with respect to health care, which is distinctly separate from a financial power of attorney. Because both the purpose and the parties involved are often different for a power of attorney related to health care than one related to finances, these documents are drafted separately. In fact, the Maine Uniform Power of Attorney Act does not even cover powers related to health care decisions. . . .

Are Your Discovery Practices Keeping up with Technological Advances?

The ubiquity of smartphones and the continuing development of mobile forensic software tools like Cellebrite have greatly increased the amount of discoverable electronically stored information. As a result, traditional methods of eDiscovery are increasingly being supplemented with evidence gathered from mobile device and cloud sources. As the use of mobile forensics grew first in criminal law, the refinement of both investigative techniques and technology has brought down many of the traditional barriers to the use of evidence contained on mobile devices in civil litigation discovery. . . .